Wednesday, July 28, 2010

David Leonhardt writes that Kindergarten matters

From the encouraging article:

On Tuesday, Mr. Chetty presented the findings — not yet peer-reviewed — at an academic conference in Cambridge, Mass. They’re fairly explosive.

Just as in other studies, the Tennessee experiment found that some teachers were able to help students learn vastly more than other teachers. And just as in other studies, the effect largely disappeared by junior high, based on test scores. Yet when Mr. Chetty and his colleagues took another look at the students in adulthood, they discovered that the legacy of kindergarten had re-emerged.

Students who had learned much more in kindergarten were more likely to go to college than students with otherwise similar backgrounds. Students who learned more were also less likely to become single parents. As adults, they were more likely to be saving for retirement. Perhaps most striking, they were earning more.

All else equal, they were making about an extra $100 a year at age 27 for every percentile they had moved up the test-score distribution over the course of kindergarten. A student who went from average to the 60th percentile — a typical jump for a 5-year-old with a good teacher — could expect to make about $1,000 more a year at age 27 than a student who remained at the average. Over time, the effect seems to grow, too.

The economists don’t pretend to know the exact causes. But it’s not hard to come up with plausible guesses. Good early education can impart skills that last a lifetime — patience, discipline, manners, perseverance. The tests that 5-year-olds take may pick up these skills, even if later multiple-choice tests do not.

Two really important points here: (1) early education does seem to matter; (2) the multiple choice tests we give older students may be deeply flawed. This is particularly problematic if these later tests are the foundation for evaluating our educational system.

3 comments:

Doug said...

A 3rd point. Is all else equal?
"All else equal, they were making about an extra $100 a year ...".
Haven't read the article, but it seems like a good case for a twin study. One twin gets the good teacher, the other does not. To control for selection bias with gifted and talented programs matching teachers and students in the school, identical twins would be best.

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